Eric Hodel (drbrain) wrote,
Eric Hodel
drbrain

OOPSLA 2005

After RubyConf Ryan and I went to OOPSLA 2005 and had a blast. I hung out with some Smalltalkers who showed me what makes Smalltalk so different and so great. We had a Ruby BoF which was a bust, mostly Rails interest. I saw a demo on IO Language with a fairly impressive GarageBand-like application and a demo on SelfSync that allowed for transparent and dynamic updates between an EER and its model representation. I was more impressed with the SelfSync demo because of how easy it was to affect your code or EER, but that was partially the power of Self.

We also looked at a couple of posters. Koichi’s poster on YARV was a stop, of course, but we also saw some other interesting posters including the poster of SelfSync, a poster by one of her colleauges on abstracting layout from code, and a third poster about reductions in defect rates and increases in productivity for test-driven versus traditional software development.

The talk about the TeaTime architecture was utterly fascinating because it had a very different view of what an Object is compared to the development world. Objects are behavior and don’t have state. There’s also some bits about temporal stuff and how messages are sent and received and how the system is kept in sync. Messages are tightly synchronized in lockstep, but clocks are allowed a small amount of slop. TeaTime will also adjust when messages occur by measuring network latency and adjust its clock to match.

The first Film Festival had one great movie as well, and the Sussman talk was wonderful. I also watched Guy Steele’s talk about building languages from simple things from a past OOPSLA. (Incidentally, after that, I muted all the audio inputs on the mixer board and turned off the staticy TV. Then the odd artist dude was trying to figure out how to turn the audio back on and was un- and re- plugging everything trying to make it work. I eventually got up and told him that his channels were all muted, which was a mistake because he was showing video of a guy using his trackpad from very up-close with an annoyingly strange audio mix.)

We had one night at the San Diego Zoo, which included an animal show. We were an incredibly unenthusiastic audience, and when the trainer called us a bunch of “smart engineers”, everybody confusedly looked at each other. I’m not sure if it was the smart part or the engineer part that confused us.

Ryan, John Lam and I talked with a recruiter from Foundation Systems at the reptile house (and previously, Ryan and I talked with her partner after he shaded her from the sun) for some time about various things. It was quite devious, because they were two technically-minded and highly attractive females at a largely-male conference, a truly deadly combination.

After the zoo we chatted with two people from the San Diego Patterns group. They meet weekly and have homework, which is really cool. I think they said they got about 10 people to each meeting, and meet in a restaurant.

On the flight home we were lucky enough to get on an earlier flight. There were more than a few OOPSLA attendees. I was at the back of the plane in the aisle row, so I got up and stood by the bathrooms so I could stay out of the way.

Before boarding, while waiting to get called for standby I was listening to one of the flight attendant’s stories about various celebrities. While I was waiting I talked with her about various things. It turns out that she used to be a nightclub manager on Sunset in Los Angeles and decided to give it up and become a flight attendant. Now instead of dealing with overindulged celebrities she deals with medical emergencies and deaths. She said she’s been working three months and has seen(?) 2 deaths (I suppose on flights she’s been on, she didn’t say).

I also owe Ryan $137.07.

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